Bird Buddies

I enjoy feeding birds. However, I have found (so far) that in my small-town urban setting, I only attract a few types of birds. Not complaining — I just think there are more species around the region I could be seeing.

I’ve not yet graduated to a heated waterer, like my father and brother have. They also live in rural settings, near forested areas. But we agree that having water for the birds, especially in winter, is a real attractant. Those guys get birds that normally don’t even stick around in the winter. They have tons of Bluebirds that stay around their houses all year. They discovered that putting mealworms in their heated waterers provides the Bluebirds with ample food (and water). Obviously the Bluebirds, who would normally migrate south, to warmer locales, must be able to keep themselves warm enough to survive the icy-cold winters on the upper Midwest — if they are provided with ample food and water.

So I believe I need to convince my wife to let me hook up a heated waterer. She doesn’t want the “unsightly” electric cord crossing our deck, so I need to figure out how to run the wire under our deck (it is a low-to-the-ground deck, not one raised up on ‘stilted’ legs). I could even bury the cord or hide it in our flower garden where my feeders are. So this will be a dual-pathed project: convincing my wife, and getting power in an unobtrusive fashion to where I will set the waterer.

Below are some photos I have snapped of my birds and squirrels that stop by to feed from my two feeders and suet feeder.

Downy Woodpecker grabbing bites from the suet feeder.

Downy Woodpecker grabbing bites from the suet feeder.

A Purple Finch snacking on seeds during a February snowstorm.

A Purple Finch snacking on seeds during a February snowstorm.

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Squirrel cleans up on the spilled seeds (many of which he gets to spill by climbing up the feeder pole and tipping the feeder).

Squirrel cleans up on the spilled seeds (many of which he gets to spill by climbing up the feeder pole and tipping the feeder).

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High-wire act by a Yellow Finch.

High-wire act by a Yellow Finch.

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